5 Books I Read in 2013

It seems that everybody is putting together their lists of “Top Books I Read in 2013”, but I can’t really call this that. Honestly, this is a list of all the books I read in 2013.

I feel a little bit bad about that — apparently it’s a good idea to read lots of books.

But, though I only read five books this year, I think this is a pretty decent little selection:

1. Pursuing Justice. by Ken Wytsma.

Pursuing Justice Review

“God’s heart beats with justice. He is greatly concerned with how we treat each other, our use of material wealth, and the extent to which we care for the marginalized. All too often, we fixate on the static study of God at the expense of participating in what God is doing in the world. God’s love in us should compel us to be tangibly involved in the needs of the world…”

read more: Pursuing Justice (A Review)

2. Prototype. by Jonathan Martin.

prototype

“I believe that somewhere, somehow, you’ve heard the music. Distant or close, you’ve heard the song of your belovedness. It’s a song of unrestrained joy, a song of hope and belonging. A song that calls you into the future. Can you even imagine what it would be like to dance the dance of children, the dance before innocence was lost?”

read more: Prototype (An Illustrated Review)

3. When We Were on Fire. by Addie Zierman.

When We Were On Fire

“We were homesick for something we could not name, but we were slipping. The structure of the evangelical church service was not big enough to accommodate the deep questions of our hearts.”

read more: When We Were on Fire (A Review)

4.  Pastrix. by Nadia Bolz-Weber.

nadiabolzweber

“What passes for preaching in many cases is more ‘here’s the problem, and here’s what you can do about it.’ That good news really should be about who God is and how God works and what God has done and what God will do.”

read more: Pastrix (A Review)

5. Jesus Feminist. by Sarah Bessey.

How I Became a Jesus Feminist

“In our religion-addled concepts of God as our get-out-of-hell card or an angry Judge, we can’t conceive of an invitation to real relationship within the peace – the shalom – of a good God. God doesn’t call us to a new law. Abba invites us to the banquet tables, to communion, to community, and to life in the Vine – not to a religious treadmill or a life of conformity.”

read more: How I Became a Jesus Feminist

In 2014, I might make a resolution – or at least a noble effort – to read more than five books.

I already have a stack I’m excited to get into — N.T. Wright, Jefferson Bethke, and Douglas Coupland. I also want to get my hands on some stuff by Brian Zahnd, Tullian Tchividjian, and Justin Lee.

Plus, I’m looking forward to reading the brand new books coming next year from Elizabeth Esther and Preston Yancey. And whatever Rachel Held Evans is working on.

What about you? What have you been reading this year? What’s on your list for 2014?

[top image: ginnerobot]

5 Books I Read in 2013

December 30, 2013 | 3 minute read

books

It seems that everybody is putting together their lists of “Top Books I Read in 2013”, but I can’t really call this that. Honestly, this is a list of all the books I read in 2013.

I feel a little bit bad about that — apparently it’s a good idea to read lots of books.

But, though I only read five books this year, I think this is a pretty decent little selection:

1. Pursuing Justice. by Ken Wytsma.

Pursuing Justice Review

“God’s heart beats with justice. He is greatly concerned with how we treat each other, our use of material wealth, and the extent to which we care for the marginalized. All too often, we fixate on the static study of God at the expense of participating in what God is doing in the world. God’s love in us should compel us to be tangibly involved in the needs of the world…”

read more: Pursuing Justice (A Review)

2. Prototype. by Jonathan Martin.

prototype

“I believe that somewhere, somehow, you’ve heard the music. Distant or close, you’ve heard the song of your belovedness. It’s a song of unrestrained joy, a song of hope and belonging. A song that calls you into the future. Can you even imagine what it would be like to dance the dance of children, the dance before innocence was lost?”

read more: Prototype (An Illustrated Review)

3. When We Were on Fire. by Addie Zierman.

When We Were On Fire

“We were homesick for something we could not name, but we were slipping. The structure of the evangelical church service was not big enough to accommodate the deep questions of our hearts.”

read more: When We Were on Fire (A Review)

4.  Pastrix. by Nadia Bolz-Weber.

nadiabolzweber

“What passes for preaching in many cases is more ‘here’s the problem, and here’s what you can do about it.’ That good news really should be about who God is and how God works and what God has done and what God will do.”

read more: Pastrix (A Review)

5. Jesus Feminist. by Sarah Bessey.

How I Became a Jesus Feminist

“In our religion-addled concepts of God as our get-out-of-hell card or an angry Judge, we can’t conceive of an invitation to real relationship within the peace – the shalom – of a good God. God doesn’t call us to a new law. Abba invites us to the banquet tables, to communion, to community, and to life in the Vine – not to a religious treadmill or a life of conformity.”

read more: How I Became a Jesus Feminist

In 2014, I might make a resolution – or at least a noble effort – to read more than five books.

I already have a stack I’m excited to get into — N.T. Wright, Jefferson Bethke, and Douglas Coupland. I also want to get my hands on some stuff by Brian Zahnd, Tullian Tchividjian, and Justin Lee.

Plus, I’m looking forward to reading the brand new books coming next year from Elizabeth Esther and Preston Yancey. And whatever Rachel Held Evans is working on.

What about you? What have you been reading this year? What’s on your list for 2014?

[top image: ginnerobot]

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